Sioux FallsRapid City

H1N1 Hits With a Vengeance

swine-flu-virusjpsOur entire country is experiencing sickness due to an elevated risk of seasonal flu and the 2009 H1N1 virus.  Serving as both a hospital and a school for children, we are paying special attention and keeping abreast of H1N1 along with the rest of the world.  To help you and your family with resources you can put to use, we’ve attached a few websites with hyperlinks that come from federal as well as local resources.  Please add any additional resources you’ve found in our comments section.

Centers for Disease Control
http://www.cdc.gov/swineflu/
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/parents/

http://www.cdc.gov/flu/freeresources/print.htm#parent

World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/en/

South Dakota Department of Health
http://doh.sd.gov/

Minnesota Department of Health
http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/idepc/diseases/flu/swine/index.html

Iowa Department of Health
http://www.idph.state.ia.us

Sioux Falls Flu Information
http://www.siouxfallsflu.org/

Keeping Your Family Safe
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/habits.htm

Before travelling, be sure to check out this map:  National Map of H1N1 Occurences

Here is a story KELO-TV of Sioux Falls recently did on our preparations for flu seasons:

The spread of 2009 H1N1 virus is thought to occur in the same way that seasonal flu spreads. Flu viruses are spread mainly from person to person through coughing or sneezing by people with influenza. Sometimes people may become infected by touching something – such as a surface or object – with flu viruses on it and then touching their mouth or nose.

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
Fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue are all signs of H1N1.  Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea. People may be infected with the flu, including 2009 H1N1 and have respiratory symptoms without a fever. Severe illnesses and death has occurred as a result of illness associated with this virus.  While most people who have been sick have recovered without needing medical treatment, hospitalizations and deaths from infection with this virus have occurred.
CDC laboratory studies have shown that no children and very few adults younger than 60 years old have existing antibody to 2009 H1N1 flu virus.  The information analyzed by CDC supports the conclusion that 2009 H1N1 flu has caused greater disease burden in people younger than 25 years of age than older people.  Those infected with seasonal and 2009 H1N1 flu may be able to infect others from 1 day before getting sick to 5 to 7 days after. This can be longer in some people, especially children and people with weakened immune systems and in people infected with the new H1N1 virus.

PROTECTION
Take these everyday steps to protect your health:

  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread this way.
  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.

If you are sick with flu-like illness, CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. (Your fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.) Keep away from others as much as possible to keep from making others sick.
Follow public health advice regarding school closures, avoiding crowds and other social distancing measures.  Be prepared in case you get sick and need to stay home for a week or so; a supply of over-the-counter medicines, alcohol-based hand rubs (for when soap and water are not available), tissues and other related items could help you to avoid the need to make trips out in public while you are sick and contagious.
Employees who are well but who have an ill family member at home with 2009 H1N1 flu can go to work as usual. These employees should monitor their health every day, and take everyday precautions including washing their hands often with soap and water, especially after they cough or sneeze. If soap and water are not available, they should use an alcohol-based hand rub. If they become ill, they should notify their supervisor and stay home. Employees who have an underlying medical condition or who are pregnant should call their health care provider for advice, because they might need to receive influenza antiviral drugs to prevent illness. 
Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs. CDC recommends that when you wash your hands — with soap and warm water — that you wash for 15 to 20 seconds. When soap and water are not available, alcohol-based disposable hand wipes or gel sanitizers may be used.  You can find them in most supermarkets and drugstores. If using gel, rub your hands until the gel is dry. The gel doesn’t need water to work; the alcohol in it kills the germs on your hands.

SICKNESS
If you or your child should get sick, CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. (Your fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.) Stay away from others as much as possible to keep from making others sick.  Staying at home means that you should not leave your home except to seek medical care. This means avoiding normal activities, including work, school, travel, shopping, social events, and public gatherings.  If you have severe illness or you are at high risk for flu complications, contact your health care provider or seek medical care. Your health care provider will determine whether flu testing or treatment is needed.
If you become ill and experience any of the following warning signs, seek emergency medical care.
In children, emergency warning signs that need urgent medical attention include:

  • Fast breathing or trouble breathing
  • Bluish or gray skin color
  • Not drinking enough fluids
  • Severe or persistent vomiting
  • Not waking up or not interacting
  • Being so irritable that the child does not want to be held
  • Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough

CONTAMINATION
Germs can be spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth. Droplets from a cough or sneeze of an infected person move through the air. Germs can be spread when a person touches respiratory droplets from another person on a surface like a desk, for example, and then touches their own eyes, mouth or nose before washing their hands.  To prevent the spread of influenza virus, it is recommended that tissues and other disposable items used by an infected person be thrown in the trash. Additionally, persons should wash their hands with soap and water after touching used tissues and similar waste.
To prevent the spread of influenza virus it is important to keep surfaces (especially bedside tables, surfaces in the bathroom, kitchen counters and toys for children) clean by wiping them down with a household disinfectant according to directions on the product label.  Linens, eating utensils, and dishes belonging to those who are sick do not need to be cleaned separately, but importantly these items should not be shared without washing thoroughly first. Linens (such as bed sheets and towels) should be washed by using household laundry soap and tumbled dry on a hot setting. Individuals should avoid “hugging” laundry prior to washing it to prevent contaminating themselves. Individuals should wash their hands with soap and water or alcohol-based hand rub immediately after handling dirty laundry.
Eating utensils should be washed either in a dishwasher or by hand with water and soap.

For more information about H1N1, visit http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu.

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"My favorite things about working at Children's Care are: my co-workers and our Rehab Center team, the fact that with the variety of disciplines represented at the rehabilitation center, I am continually learning something new that I can apply to my job and therapy skills, and the variety of clients I can see in one day."
– Shawn F., Physical Therapist